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    Karen Young:

    Research every teacher should know: growth mindset

    Main findings that are important for all teachers to know: - Children who were praised for their intelligence were more likely to choose future tasks that they thought would make them look smart. Children who had been praised for their effort tended to choose tasks that would help them learn new things. -Children praised for their intelligence said they enjoyed the task less when compared to the children who had been praised for their effort. -Children praised for their intelligence were less likely to persist on tasks than the children who had been praised for their effort. -Children who had been praised for their intelligence performed worse in future tasks. The children who had been praised for their effort performed better in future tasks. -The majority (86%) of children praised for their intelligence asked for information about how their peers did on the same task. Only 23% of children who had been praised for effort asked for this type of feedback – most of them asked for feedback about how they could do better. -A significant proportion (38%) of children praised for their ability lied about the number of problems they solved in the task. Only 13% of the children praised for effort did the same.